Wednesday, October 5, 2011

Adjective Clauses and Relative Pronouns

"The Waterfall" Henri Rousseau, 1910



Combine the two sentences. Change the underlined pronoun in the second sentence to a relative pronoun such as "that", "who", or "whose". Make sure your adjective clause immediately follows the noun it modifies, even if you have to break the main clause.



After writing the sentences, listen to each correct sentence and repeat it after the speaker.


1. I like people. They are good listeners.



2. I bought a computer. It doesn't work very well.



3. She's a woman. She always eats nutritious food.



4. This is the camera. I bought it last week.



5. These are the photographs. I told you about them.



6. I notice people. They wear colorful clothes.



7. I finally bought the dress. I tried it on three times yesterday.



8. The movie wasn't very interesting. I saw it last night.



9. I know a teacher. Her classes are always full.



10. She's the excellent nurse. I wanted to tell you about her.



11. I didn't like the car. I test drove it yesterday.



12. The clown made everyone laugh. He rode backwards on an elephant.



13. The airplane landed successfully. It almost crashed.



14. Alan was hit by a flowerpot. It had fallen off a windowsill.



15. Then, he was splashed by a car. It had driven through a mud puddle.



16. My neighbor complains about my stereo. His tenants play drums loudly until midnight.



17. I have a good friend. He lives in Brazil.



18. I admire people. They aren't afraid to work hard.



19. The house is no longer for sale. I checked it out yesterday.



20. Some of the students are in the G.E.D. program. I taught them last year.



21. The boy was bitten by a dog. He delivers our newspapers.



22. Both dogs chased the ball. I threw it as far as I could.



23. The nurse gave the patient an injection. It made him go to sleep.



24. Students should take them to the hall. Their cell phones ring in class.



25. The apartment is downtown. My friends have rented it.



For more information on relative pronouns and relative clauses, see the Owl Purdue Writing Lab.